Qoldwater – Source

CHUNK069: Qoldwater’s “Source” is a five track piece of withdrawn Techno-Beats, surrounded by lots of ambient scapes or classical music or something, building up a vaguely extensive atmosphere…

Mother Vacuum – Fucking, Freaking, Breaking, Streaking, Joking And Poking …. Nothing Else

After Father Valium comes Mother Vacuum: Apparently some Techno influences here, but the tracks are very “africanic”: A mixture between something like the Gqom-Style, Polyrhythms , Techno and -to add something more- Vaporwave-styled production. Some kind of strange… CHUNK068

btw: Chunk Records has now a Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Chunk-Records-1905689853029430

Father Valium – Lobotomy 2017

For a few weeks there were no new albums produced, but today the first Father Valium, “Lobotomy 2017” is out as CHUNK067. This is the first pure Techno drums, sequences and filters driven, almost energic and sometimes strange tracks. Should be heard loud.

Music Business is not Music Part 5 : Back in 1988

It was back in the springtime of 1988. I had finished my Gyrator tape “Missing Girl File Closed” and a few of them copies were sent across the country. You can have a listen here:

Remember: there was no internet available, everything was done by letters and packages, delivered by the postage system; maybe -well, just the talking- by telephone.
Ok, one day there was a letter in the box saying that a promotion company heard my tape and wanted to do a studio demo to sell it to a label. Hm, that didn’t sound bad. So, after a while there was a contract of four or five pages with lots of judicial odds and ends which I can’t remember of. And: For the whole service I had to bear part of the costs, 1000 DM, which would be paid back when the record sells. Anyway, this is a point where I had to take a break. But I didn’t. I signed the contract, I paid the 1000 DM, and in the summertime I arrived in a well-known studio in the north of Germany where I had to spend the next two or three days.
As most of the machinery was absolutely new to me, there were two studio engineers which I had to work with… and as they both preferred rock or hard rock music and they couldn’t cope with my idea of drum machines and noise guitars, things started off in a hardly way. I wanted a reverb on a final track – “this is not possible”, I wanted to add more effects here or there – “can’t do”, and the first day I struggled most of the time with the technicians, it was more frustrating and not very productive.
On the second day we recorded a new version of “Missing Girl File Closed” which came better, and worked out. Then, another visitor arrived to whom I had a good wire (he was also interested in the upcoming sampling technique and HipHop) and we produced an unpreprared HipHop-Like track with lots of scratches and starting samples directly from vinyl into the beat, and this part was most of the fun, and the track was not bad – when I’m listening to it today I must admit, it’s kinda silly and poor:

This is the other song – Actually I don’t like my voice on this track, and all sounds like tidy and clean which I never liked in the first place

After the recordings I returned to a friend; a few days later it was supposed to do the end mix, and I took this friend with me. I don’t know what has happened but they didn’t let me into the studio and talked about “oh there has been some appointment overlay, and we have to do the mix later”. Hm, ok, their reaction was some kind of strange, but a few days the mix was done, and I made copies of the songs to an audiotape because the original tape (on the band machine) were sent to the promotion company who told me that there maybe some label interest for the “Missing” track.

But then the weeks turned into months, and nothing more happened. I once called the promotion company, but they hadn’t any news for me, and they never called back after this. If I didn’t record my tracks to this audiotape, I would not have the recordings today.

Over all: Fuck ’em, I guess the whole thing was a scam, a make believe, they just wanted to rent some studio time for a small price because they couldn’t sell it otherwise. I must admit that the time in a professional studio was some kind of interesting, also kind of fun (especially the later days). But was it worth 1000 DM? I’m not sure… but I’m sure that I liked the experience over all, and never really regretted it…

Takuya Mitarashi – A-C

I almost forgot that there is one new album after the 2-year-plan. The name of the new artist is Takuya Mitarashi, and what he does, is loopy strange sound: Starts off like some kind of safespace… but then really fast turn into a cacophony of sounds, noises, accords and single tones and compounds, finally left off into the delay chamber. Anyway, it’s a hard listen, and I did not find it so remarkable these times. This is CHUNK066.

Meanwhile I combed through my archives, and I found some old stuff from the late 1980s, 1990s and also the early 2000s in my vault. So I put up eight another albums from back of these days:
First there are the Maffick series –
As the original tapes aren’t available anymore, the first is a compilation from these tapes. Strange, noisy industrial ebm like stuff primarily based on samples:

The second is just another compilation of stuff that was never released and some “second best of”:

The third one is another compilation with some re-mixes, more unreleased tracks, but they might be some overlaps with the two first compilations:

From the early 2000s there are two more Arc Maffick albums. Still hard, uncompromising EBM-Industrial beats which were not released properly ever before; now based primarily on synthesizers and drum machines:


The last one from the Maffick series is Coma Coma’s “Coma Coma Boom Boom” which is also ebm and industrial based, but sounds much more friendly:

The second production line is the Coordinator series. Derived from HipHop-Samples, the music turned out into some kind of strange industrial HipHop instrumental tracks which few distorted vocals – this could have been some early proto-vaporwave. For this time there are two albums (released as tapes, edition of 10 or 12 back in 1988 and 1989):


There are still a few in the archive pipe, so stay tuned.

But the future is now more important than these yesteryears. What is definite: there will be another Killjoe album, another Takuya Mitarashi, and maybe Drinkfish will do one. There are more projects, but they just in “planned” stadium, so no definites about the names or the styles.